Frequently Asked Questions

General

What happens to the waste we throw away?Back to Top

In Derbyshire 530,000 tonnes of waste was collected in 2007/08. Around 38% of household waste was
recycled/composted through kerbside recycling schemes, bring banks and through the Household Waste
Recycling Centres.

These services are continually being developed to further increase the recycling and composting rates
achieved. The remaining 295,000 tonnes of waste was sent to landfill – this is enough waste to fill a third
of Wembley Stadium.

Derby City Council and Derbyshire County Council have set a joint recycling target of 55% by 2020. The
Derbyshire Joint Municipal Waste Management Strategy sets out the extensive waste minimisation, reuse,
recycling and composting services which are being expanded to ensure that this target is met. The new
facilities proposed by RRS will help to exceed this target, reduce landfill and recover energy from the residual
waste left over after recycling has taken.

What is the Joint Municipal Waste Management Strategy?Back to Top

The Derbyshire Joint Municipal Waste Management Strategy (2006) has been produced and adopted by
Derbyshire County Council, Derby City Council and the eight district/borough councils. The Strategy looks
at how rubbish will be managed over the next 20 years in Derbyshire.

The Strategy was developed to ensure that the Derbyshire Councils manage waste better by minimising,
reusing, recycling and composting as much waste as possible. Additionally, the Strategy will ensure that the
residual waste is managed appropriately to reduce reliance on landfill as far as possible. The Strategy will also
seek to ensure that the Councils achieve their landfill diversion targets set by Government therefore avoiding
any potential fines.

The Strategy identified a range of treatment methods which are available including:

Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facilities – where materials, such as metals and some
plastics, are removed from the waste, which is then treated and can be composted, processed to
extract energy (heat and/or electricity) or disposed of in a landfill site.

Anaerobic digestion (AD) facilities – where waste is put into a type of composting plant that has
no air present. The waste rots and produces methane gas which can be used to generate electricity.
The remaining material is sent to a landfill site.

Energy recovery – where waste is burnt to produce heat and electricity. Some metals are removed
with magnets before taking the ash to a landfill site or using it in the construction industry.

What is the joint waste management contract?Back to Top

Against the background of the Derbyshire Joint Municipal Waste Management Strategy, Derby City Council and
Derbyshire County Council invited waste management companies, such as Resource Recovery Solutions, to bid
for a joint waste management contract. This process invited bidders to propose the best solution for dealing
with Derby and Derbyshire’s waste and it was on this basis that RRS was chosen.

The 27-year contract will deliver the objectives set out in the waste strategy, including the development of a
new treatment facility to enable waste to be diverted away from landfill. RRS was selected as preferred bidder
to take this contract forward. The contract is not a Private Finance Initiative but will see an investment of £500
million in Derby and Derbyshire.

Who is Resource Recovery Solutions?Back to Top

Resource Recovery Solutions Ltd is a partnership between United Utilities and Interserve. RRS provides cost
effective and environmentally sound waste management solutions for local authorities.

United Utilities is the UK’s largest listed water company. United Utilities owns, operates and maintains utility
assets including water, wastewater, electricity and gas. United Utilities is a UK FTSE 100 company, has a
turnover of £2bn and is the UK’s market leader in utility outsourcing. United Utilities operates a highly
successful multi-utility connection business and manages metering contracts. United Utilities provides services
to over 20m people worldwide – across Europe, the Middle East, Australia and the Philippines.

For further details about United Utilities visit www.unitedutilities.com

Interserve is a services, maintenance and building group operating in the public and private sectors, both in the
UK and internationally. The company offers advice, design, construction and facilities management services for
society’s infrastructure and provides a range of plant and equipment in specialist fields.

For further details about Interserve visit www.interserveplc.co.uk

Why do we need new facilities?Back to Top

In Derby City and Derbyshire, over 500,000 tonnes of municipal waste is collected each year. In 2007/8,
more than 295,000 tonnes was sent to landfill – enough waste to fill a third of Wembley Stadium.

We can’t keep relying on landfill:

  • We must act to reduce the environmental impact of landfill – when waste is landfilled it creates
    methane which is a potent greenhouse gas
  • Derby City Council and Derbyshire County Council could face costs of millions of pounds if they don’t
    meet strict targets to reduce landfill – which could see Council Tax increase

Reducing, reusing and recycling is an important part of managing Derby and Derbyshire’s
waste sustainably. The Councils have developed and implemented various countywide waste minimisation and
reuse schemes which have been on-going for a number of years. These include a Home Composting Campaign,
Real Nappy Campaign, Promotion of Furniture Reuse schemes, the EcoSchools Scheme, a Waste Awareness
Campaign – promoting recycling, reusable bags, smart shopping – and Love Food, Hate Waste. Alongside this
there is continuous development of extensive recycling through kerbside collection schemes, bring banks and
at Household Waste Recycling Centres.

RRS will work with the Councils to minimise the amount of waste produced and to encourage households to
recycle as much as possible. Derby City Council and Derbyshire County Council have set a joint recycling target
of 55% by 2020. However, not all waste can be managed this way and extra facilities are needed to deal with
the waste left after recycling and to reduce the amount sent to landfill.

What are the benefits of the proposals?Back to Top

The proposals offer a number of benefits:

  • Providing an alternative to mass landfilling which is no longer ethically, environmentally
    or financially sustainable
  • Diverting around 180,000 tonnes (equivalent to the weight of 23,904 double decker buses)
    of waste from landfill
  • Assisting in reducing Derby City Council and Derbyshire County Council’s carbon footprint – saving over
    48,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide every year, as calculated by the Environment Agency’s WRATE (Waste
    and Resources Assessment Tool). The equivalent of taking more than 16,000 cars off the road each year
  • Helping the Councils avoid significant fines if they don’t meet strict targets to reduce landfill – which
    could see Council Tax increase
  • Meeting Landfill Allowance Trading Scheme (LATS) targets each year up to 2020 and beyond
  • Offering value for money
  • Representing an investment of £500 million in Derby and Derbyshire. This contact is not a
    Private Finance Initiative (PFI)
  • Helping Derby City Council and Derbyshire County Council meet its joint recycling target of 55% by 2020
  • Allowing energy to be recovered from the waste left over after recycling has taken place, generating
    enough electricity to power 14,000 homes
  • Using proven, safe technologies for waste management
  • Redeveloping a contaminated site at Sinfin Lane
  • Creating employment opportunities for local people

How can I have my say on the proposals?Back to Top

There are a number of ways you can feedback on the proposals. You can have your say by calling the
FREEPHONE information line, writing to us at the FREEPOST address, emailing
[email protected], or via the online feedback form on the website
www.resourcerecoverysolutions.co.uk

You can also comment on the Corbriggs proposal directly to Derbyshire County Council who are undertaking their own formal consultation as part of the planning process. Further details of this will be found on the Council's website www.derbyshire.gov.uk.

Subject to the approval of the Sinfin Lane planning application a Community Liaison Group will provide an ongoing forum for discussion throughout the construction and operation of the facility.

What is involved in the planning process?Back to Top

Prior to submitting its planning applications, RRS has undertaken an engagement programme on its proposals for new waste management facilities across Derby and Derbyshire. Local residents and stakeholders have received newsletters outlining the proposals and have been invited to the public information days where the plans could be discussed with the project team directly.

Following submission of a planning application, the relevant Council will notify a range of consultees, including local residents and site neighbours. Comments received through this process will be reviewed and Council planning officers will make a recommendation to approve, approve with conditions or refuse the application. A final decision is then made by the elected members who make up each Council's Planning Committee.

When do you expect a decision to be made?Back to Top

A planning application for Magfern's Yard was submitted to Derby City Council in April 2009 and was approved on 3rd July 2009. A planning application for Clover Nook was submitted to Derbyshire County Council in April 2009 and was approved on 3rd August 2009. The planning application for Sinfin Lane was submitted to Derby City Council in May 2009 and has been refused. RRS has lodged an appeal with the Planning Inspectorate against the decision and a Public Inquiry is expected to be heard in September 2010.

RRS submitted the planning application for Corbriggs in January 2010 with a decision expected by Derbyshire County Council in early Spring 2010.

Sinfin Lane

Why has the Sinfin Lane site been chosen?Back to Top

RRS undertook an assessment of potential sites in the area, with Sinfin Lane being identified as the most
appropriate. The criteria used during this process included availability, risk of flooding and the size of the site.
In addition, the site has good connections to the local highways.

What is currently on the site?Back to Top

The site is undeveloped following the demolition of the previous tannery buildings that occupied the site.
The area is now made up of rough grass and shrub vegetation, with no buildings visible above ground.

What is being proposed for Sinfin Lane?Back to Top

A state-of-the-art recycling and treatment facility is proposed at Sinfin Lane in Derby. It will accept up to
200,000 tonnes of residual waste per year from Derby City and Derbyshire.

The new waste treatment facility will include:

  • A Waste Treatment Facility Reception and Recycling Hall to store and sort waste received at the site
  • A Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facility which creates a Mixed Waste Fuel
  • An Advanced Conversion Technology (ACT) facility which converts the energy contained in the Mixed
    Waste Fuel into useful electrical energy
  • A Visitor and Education Centre which will give local schools and members of the public the opportunity
    to learn more about waste management, and can be used as a local community centre facility

This contract does not include collecting, managing or receiving recyclable materials from kerbside collections
or recycling banks, which will be unaffected by these proposals. These recycling services will continue to be
expanded by the Derbyshire Councils and sent to the normal recycling processors.

Where will the facility accept waste from?Back to Top

The facility will accept waste from Derby and Derbyshire.

How much waste will the facility process?Back to Top

The facility will process up to 190,000 tonnes of waste per year from Derby and Derbyshire. It will divert up
to 180,000 tonnes of waste from landfill.

Does the facility conform to the ‘waste hierarchy’?Back to Top

Yes. Reducing, reusing and recycling are an important part of managing Derby and Derbyshire’s waste. RRS
will work with Derby City Council and Derbyshire County Council to encourage people to minimise waste and
increase reuse and recycling, in line with the joint Council target to meet recycling levels of 55% by 2020.
However, not all waste can be dealt with this way and new facilities are needed to reduce the amount of
residual waste (left after recycling) being sent to landfill.

How will the Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facility work?Back to Top

The Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) facility converts the remaining non-recycled waste into a renewable
fuel. The facility will be capable of processing approximately 60,000 tonnes of waste per year.

Step 1 ‘Black bag’ rubbish is delivered to the waste reception hall, where cranes will remove large recyclables
and non-processible objects

Step 2 The material is then dried for a period of approximately two weeks. This treats the waste by
stabilising it

Step 3 The dried waste is screened and further items are removed for recycling such as stones, glass and
metals. The remaining material, known as Refuse Derived Fuel, is then mixed with other non-recycled,
non-hazardous household waste to create a Mixed Waste Fuel, which can then be used in the ACT facility to
generate renewable electricity.

How will the Advanced Conversion Technology (ACT) facility work?Back to Top

The ENERGOS Advanced Conversion Treatment (ACT) facility uses a patented gasification process to recover
energy from the Mixed Waste Fuel prepared by the MBT facility. This state-of-the-art technology turns waste to
energy in an efficient and environmentally friendly process.

  • The facility uses a gasification process which generates an energy-rich syngas (synthetic gas) from
    the prepared fuel under strictly controlled conditions
  • The syngas produced is collected and used as a fuel to generate steam in high efficiency traditional
    boilers
  • This steam is then fed into a turbine which generates renewable electricity which is supplied to the
    local grid
  • The inert ash left over from the gasification process will be used in as an aggregate replacement in
    concrete block manufacture

Are these technologies proven?Back to Top

Entsorga, the proposed partner for the MBT process, have a number of similar schemes operating, or in
development, within Europe. A major new facility is planned for Wiltshire and another facility in Vazzano,
Italy is operational.

ENERGOS is the proposed partner for the ACT process. The ENERGOS technology was specifically chosen
by RRS due to its proven track record. ENERGOS has seven plants operating in Europe, similar to those
proposed at Sinfin Lane. This includes the Isle of Wight in the UK, Scandinavia and Germany. ENERGOS
waste management facilities are planned in several locations across the UK, including Ayrshire, Merseyside and
North Lincolnshire.

How many jobs will the facility create?Back to Top

The facility will create 38 operational jobs and between 60 and 80 construction jobs. During the construction of
the facility, the contractor will work to establish relationships with a number of local suppliers and businesses.

What is the construction timetable for this facility?Back to Top

If planning permission is granted for the facility, construction is expected to begin on site in April 2010. The
Reception and Recycling Hall will be operational by October 2011 and the ACT plant will be delivered around
June 2012 when the site will become fully operational.

What are the operating hours of the facility?Back to Top

The facility will operate 24-hours a day, seven days a week. Deliveries to the facility will only take place:

Monday – Friday:
7am – 5pm
Saturday:
7am – 1pm
Sunday:
7am – 9am

Do you need an Environmental Permit to operate the facility?Back to Top

There are a number of directives and regulations that apply to any waste facility. In addition to securing
planning permission, the proposed facility must gain a permit to operate from the Environment Agency. The
permit (granted under the Environmental Permit Regulations) will control all operations and will only be granted
if the Environment Agency is sure that the facility can be operated without significant adverse impact on people
and the environment.

Will this mean more traffic?Back to Top

Currently, there are around 13,000 movements on Sinfin Lane each weekday and the new facility would increase
this by less than 3%. A Transport Assessment, which forms part of the planning application, shows that the local
road network can accommodate this small increase without any notiable effect. A new traffic junction will be built
at the site entrance onto Sinfin Lane – this will be positioned further away from the railway bridge than the
existing entrance to improve visibility and will involve some road surface improvements.

If I live close to the site will I be able to see the facility?Back to Top

A Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment will accompany the planning application, which will outline
measures to protect local people against the visual impact of the facility. The facility will be designed to
minimise the visual impact. The facility will be set back towards the rear of the site, away from residential
housing and a landscaped earth bank with trees and shrubs would be constructed between the new facility and
the adjacent Railway Cottages.  The facility will have an attractive, modern design in keeping with other
buildings in the area. A Landscape Master Plan will also be prepared for the site, which will take into account
any additional landscaping that the Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment identifies. The layout of the
facility has been designed so that the Visitor and Education centre and offices are the buildings visible from
Sinfin Lane.

Will it smell?Back to Top

Waste will be delivered by covered vehicles into an enclosed reception area before being processed. All
processes will operate in a fully enclosed, purpose-built facility. The proposed new waste facility will operate
under a negative air pressure system to prevent odour. The system works by sucking air into the building when
the doors are opened preventing any odours escaping. In addition, a biofilter will manage the flow of air as part
of the process operations, and odour control sprays can be installed at each door.

Will it be noisy?Back to Top

The Environmental Permit issued by the Environment Agency and required to operate the facility will set
acceptable noise levels. All areas of the facility will be designed and built to minimise noise impacts. Any
equipment which could be noisy will be housed within the facility's acoustic insulated building which will minimise
noise. A Noise Assessment has been undertaken as part of the planning application which shows that routine
operations and traffic associated with the development will not impact on the local area, with only a slight increase
above background noise expected.

Will the facility produce emissions?Back to Top

The Energos Advanced Conversion Technology (ACT) being proposed is already widely used in Norway and
Germany. It was chosen by RRS for its low emissions levels – which are a fraction of the strict limits permitted
under European regulations – and these emissions will be constantly monitored.

The Environmental Statement which accompanies the planning application has assessed the potential impact
of the facility on local air quality. This takes into account other existing and proposed developments in the area
and the Air Quality Management Area which is adjacent to the Sinfin Lane site. A wide range of assessments into
the potential impact of the low levels of emissions from the facility have been undertaken which show that local
air quality will be protected.

Furthermore, should planning permission be granted the operational aspects of the plant will be strictly controlled
by an Environmental Permit issued by the Environment Agency.

How green will the facility be?Back to Top

Managing waste this way will help towards combating climate change by diverting waste from landfill, recycling
more waste, reducing waste transport movements and generating energy. This will save over 48,000 tonnes
of carbon dioxide being produced per year (as calculated by the Environment Agency’s WRATE tool). The
equivalent of taking more than 16,000 cars off the road per year.

The design of the facility will be guided by the sustainable principles set out in the Governments Strategy
‘Building a better quality of life – A strategy for more sustainable construction’. A Sustainability Assessment
will also be undertaken as part of the planning application process.

Magfern’s Yard

What is currently on the site?Back to Top

The site is located on West Meadows Industrial Estate and presently operates as a Waste Transfer Station,
which is operated by Magfern’s Recycling Ltd.

What is planned?Back to Top

RRS’ delivery of new waste management facilities will be phased. An initial Waste Transfer Station has been approved at Magfern’s Yard, West Meadows Industrial Estate, Downing Road, Derby. The Waste Transfer Station at
Magfern’s Yard would be required for a temporary period of about two years whilst the Sinfin Lane facility is
being built. The Waste Transfer Station will replace the existing facility on the site, currently operated by
Magfern’s Recycling Ltd.

The Waste Transfer Station will be used to transfer waste collected from refuse collection vehicles onto bigger
vehicles for onward disposal to landfill. The facility will accept up to 110,000 tonnes of ‘black bag’ rubbish per year.

The proposed facility will include:

  • a new free-standing waste handling building
  • a weighbridge
  • a new gatehouse
  • keeping existing separate office/facilities
  • existing vehicle delivery and car parking areas

Why was this site chosen for a Waste Transfer Station?Back to Top

The site was considered appropriate as it already operates as a Waste Transfer Station and is located close to
where waste is produced reducing the distances refuse collection vehicles have to travel.

What is the Waste Transfer Station for?Back to Top

Once ‘black bag’ rubbish is collected from households, if it cannot be delivered directly to a disposal point the
waste will go to a transfer station where it will be transferred onto bigger vehicles for onward disposal. The use
of bigger vehicles helps to reduce carbon dioxide levels as fewer vehicles are needed to transport the waste.
The Waste Transfer Station will also allow the waste to be temporarily stored, if the landfill disposal point is
ever closed due to poor weather conditions.

How much waste will the facility process?Back to Top

The facility will accept up to 110,000 tonnes of ‘black bag’ rubbish per year.

Will it smell?Back to Top

All handling of waste will take place inside enclosed buildings and waste will not be stored or handled in the
open air. The buildings will be designed to minimise and control any smells. Odour control sprays will be installed
on all doors. Waste delivered to the transfer station will be loaded onto larger trucks for onward transportation
within 24 hours to help prevent the generation of smells.

Will it be noisy?Back to Top

The facilities have been designed to minimise noise and all handling of waste will take place inside enclosed
buildings. There will be no waste processing or sorting machinery on the site. The planning permission needed to
build the Waste Transfer Stations will set strict limits for noise to ensure that the facility has no unacceptable
impact on local people.

Deliveries to the facility will only take place:

Monday – Friday:
7am – 5pm
Saturday:
7am – 1pm
Sunday:
7am – 9am

Before we can operate any new facilities we will need planning permission from Derbyshire County Council and
a permit from the Environment Agency. These will only be granted if the Council and the Environment Agency
can be satisfied that the proposed facility can operate without adverse impacts on people and the environment.

Will this mean more traffic?Back to Top

The replacement facility proposed for the site is likely to increase the amount of traffic by just 0.7% during peak
periods, which the local highway network can easily accommodate without any noticeable effect. The existing
entrance on Downing Road will be used by vehicles to access the site. The site can be accessed easily by
employees via cycling and walking, as well as public transport services stopping on Nottingham Road.

Clover Nook

What is currently on the site?Back to Top

The site is located off Grange Close, Clover Nook Industrial Estate, Alfreton, Derbyshire.

What is planned?Back to Top

The Waste Transfer Station has been granted planning approval and will be used to transfer waste collected from refuse collection vehicles onto bigger vehicles for onwards disposal to the new facility at Sinfin Lane, Derby.

The facility will include:

  • a new waste handling building
  • a weighbridge
  • sufficient purpose-built storage to hold 4 average days inputs
  • offloading areas for gully waste for dewatering, road sweepings, street cleansing and a steel container
    to store low hazardous clinical waste
  • in-built safety systems to ensure that risks associated with on site traffic movements and tipping
    are eliminated

Why was this site chosen for a Waste Transfer Station?Back to Top

The site was chosen because it already has an existing planning permission for a waste facility, has good access to the road network and is located near to where waste is collected reducing the distances refuse collection vehicles have to travel.

What is the Waste Transfer Station for?Back to Top

Once ‘black bag’ rubbish is collected from households, if it cannot be delivered directly to a disposal point the
waste will go to a transfer station where it will be transferred onto bigger vehicles for onward disposal. The use
of bigger vehicles helps to reduce carbon dioxide levels as fewer vehicles are needed to transport the waste.

How much waste will the facility process?Back to Top

The facility will accept up to 50,000 tonnes of ‘black bag’ waste per year.

Will it smell?Back to Top

All handling of waste will take place inside enclosed buildings and waste will not be stored or handled in the
open air. The buildings will be designed to minimise and control any smells. Odour control sprays will be installed
on all doors. Waste delivered to the transfer station will be loaded onto larger trucks for onward transportation
within 24 hours to help prevent the generation of smells.

Will it be noisy?Back to Top

The facilities have been designed to minimise noise and all handling of waste will take place inside enclosed
buildings. There will be no waste processing or sorting machinery on the site. The planning permission needed
to build the Waste Transfer Stations will set strict limits for noise to ensure that the facility has no unacceptable
impact on local people.

Deliveries to the facility will only take place:

Monday – Friday:
7am – 5pm
Saturday:
7am – 1pm
Sunday:
7am – 9am

Before we can operate any new facilities we will need planning permission from Derbyshire County Council and
a permit from the Environment Agency. These will only be granted if the Council and the Environment Agency
can be satisfied that the proposed facility can operate without adverse impacts on people and the environment.

Will this mean more traffic?Back to Top

The planning application will be accompanied by a full Transport Assessment which is currently being
undertaken. It is anticipated that there will be around 54 traffic movements to the site per day. A new access
junction onto Grange Close will be constructed. Full details will be outlined in the Transport Assessment.

The site currently has an existing approved planning permission for a Waste Transfer Station, which allows for
up to 60,000 tonnes of material to be delivered each year. RRS’ application seeks permission for up to 50,000
tonnes per year and the Transport Assessment, which accompanies the planning application, shows that our
new application is expected to generate fewer traffic movements than the existing consented scheme, with
54 traffic movements a day.

Corbriggs

What is currently on the site?Back to Top

The site is located approximately 4km to the south east of Chesterfield and 14km to the north east of Matlock,
in an established industrial area. An existing Waste Recycling and Transfer Station, operated by MXG, currently occupies the site. MXG’s offices are located to the south west of the site at Alexander House and other industrial buildings accommodating industrial and waste uses are located to the south east. MXG is a specialist recycling company.

What is being proposed?Back to Top

As the Corbriggs facility already operates as a Waste Transfer Station no new buildings/structures are needed
on the site, apart from two portacabins, an additional weighbridge, an external gully waste store and additional container storage.

Why was this site chosen for a Waste Transfer Station?Back to Top

RRS looked at a number of sites in North Derbyshire before selecting the MXG Waste Transfer Station at
Corbriggs. Out of 71 sites initially shortlisted, RRS conducted a more detailed appraisal of 18 sites.

This detailed appraisal scored the sites against a number of criteria – availability, deliverability, planning
vision, allocation in abandoned Waste Preferred Options DPD, sensitive human receptors, landscape and
visual consideration, potential impacts on natural environment, potential impact on historic environment and
built heritage, road access, flood risk and ground water vulnerability, air quality management areas and
green belt.

Against this background, the Corbriggs site was chosen as a suitable site for the following reasons:

  • The site is located within an established industrial area
  • The site is well related to the primary road network with good connections to the A617
  • The site benefits from screening by existing trees and landforms and other industrial buildings
  • The site already operates as a Waste Transfer Station and can be developed without additional transfer buildings
  • The principle of waste development has been found to be acceptable at the site and it already benefits from planning permission for waste uses

What will the Waste Transfer Station do?Back to Top

The Waste Transfer Station will be used to transfer waste collected from refuse collection vehicles onto bigger vehicles for onward disposal to the Waste Treatment Facility or to landfill. The use of bigger vehicles helps to
reduce carbon dioxide levels as fewer vehicles are needed to transport the waste.

How much waste will the facility process?Back to Top

It is expected that the Waste Transfer Station will deal with an additional 24,000 to 48,000 tonnes of waste
per year, bringing the total capacity of the facility to 47,500 to 71,500 tonnes per year.

Will it smell?Back to Top

The Air Quality Assessment, which has been submitted alongside the planning application, outlines the
mitigation measures that will be in place to control odour and shows that local air quality will be protected
both during construction and then operation.

All municipal waste will be handled and stored inside the existing Waste Transfer Station building, which is located
to the north of the site, further away from residential properties along Mansfield Road.

To help prevent odours, waste delivered to the building will be loaded onto bulker trucks for onward transportation within 24 hour, but usually within a few hours of arriving at the site. A high standard of housekeeping on the site
will also help to minimise odours.

Will it be noisy?Back to Top

The Noise Assessment, which has been submitted alongside the planning application, concludes that noise
due to the upgrade will not be significant.

The facility has been designed to minimise noise and all handling of waste will take place inside enclosed
buildings. There will be no waste processing or sorting machinery on the site. The planning permission needed
to upgrade the Waste Transfer Station will set strict limits for noise to ensure that the facility has no unacceptable
impact on local people.

Will it affect air quality?Back to Top

The Air Quality Assessment shows that the Waste Transfer Station is unlikely to affect local air quality
during construction or operation. The Assessment, which has been submitted alongside the planning application,
assessed the potential impacts on local air quality during the construction and operation of the diversified
Waste Transfer Station.

The facility has been designed to manage any dust generated during the operation of the facility – including
the enclosure of all municipal waste within the building, the containment of waste in steel sealed containers,
the provision of a concrete surface across the site and the adoption of good housekeeping measures.

These good housekeeping measures include sheeting of vehicles, avoiding the dispersal of litter, the removal
and bagging of any spilled materials, the covering of stockpiled building and demolition waste with sheeting, the dampening down of potentially dusty areas, road sweeping and the immediate stopping of operations should dust emissions from the use of equipment on the site be visible outside the site boundary.

Do you need an Environmental Permit to operate the facility?Back to Top

Before the upgraded facility can be operated, planning permission is required from Derbyshire County Council
and a variation to the existing waste management license is required from the Environment Agency. These will
only be granted if both the Council and the Environment Agency can be satisfied that the proposed facility can
operate without adverse impacts on people and the environment.

Will this mean more traffic?Back to Top

A Transport Assessment, which accompanies the application, has been completed in conjunction with the
proposal to analyse the route and the anticipated levels of traffic. The Assessment demonstrates that the
local road network can accommodate the increase in traffic.

The MXG Waste Transfer Station will be used to transfer waste collected from refuse collection vehicles onto
bigger vehicles for onward disposal. The use of bigger vehicles helps to reduce carbon dioxide levels as fewer
vehicles are needed to transport the waste.

It is anticipated that approximately 57 HGVs and up to 14 staff vehicles will visit the site each day; a total of
142 daily vehicle movements, of which 114 will be HGV movements. This will increase traffic by approximately
52 vehicles per day when compared with existing operations on the site, but is an increase of just 1.4% in the
number of vehicle movements per day along Mansfield Road, which will have no noticeable impact on the local
road network.